Teaching Anglophone Caribbean Literature

  • Editor: Supriya M. Nair
  • Pages: x & 459 pp.
  • Published: 2012
  • ISBN: 9781603291064 (Cloth)
  • ISBN: 9781603291071 (Paperback)
“This volume offers the necessary coverage, the range of critical approaches, and the practical instruction that will make it very useful to anyone teaching the subject . . . a balanced and informed discussion.”—J. Michael Dash, New York University

This volume in the Options for Teaching series recognizes that the most challenging aspect of introducing students to anglophone Caribbean literature—the sheer variety of intellectual and artistic traditions in Western and non-Western cultures that relate to it—also offers the greatest opportunities to teachers. Courses on anglophone literature in the Caribbean can consider the region’s specific histories and contexts even as they explore common issues: the legacies of slavery, colonialism, and colonial education; nationalism; exile and migration; identity and hybridity; class and racial conflict; gender and sexuality; religion and ritual. While considering how the availability of materials shapes syllabi, this volume recommends print, digital, and visual resources for teaching.

The essays examine a host of topics, including the following:

  • the development of multiethnic populations in the Caribbean and the role of various creole languages in the literature
  • oral art forms, such as dub poetry and reggae music
  • the influence of anglophone literature in the Caribbean on literary movements outside it, such as the Harlem Renaissance and black British writing
  • Carnival
  • religious rituals and beliefs
  • specific genres such as slave narratives and autobiography
  • film and drama
  • the economics of rum

Many essays list resources for further reading, and the volume concludes with a section of additional teaching resources.

Nicole N. Aljoe
Giselle Liza Anatol
Alisa K. Braithwaite
Albert Braz
Joshua Albert Brewer
Timothy Chin
Carolyn Cooper
Grant Farred
Rhonda Frederick
Shane Graham
Vivian Nun Halloran
John C. Hawley
Brinda Mehta
Paula Morgan
Denise deCaires Narain
Jennifer P. Nesbitt
Sandra Pouchet Paquet
Louis J. Parascandola
Mimi Pipino
Elaine Savory
April Shemak
Faith Smith
Karina Smith
Elizabeth Way

Acknowledgments (ix)

Introduction: Caribbean Groundings and Limbo Gateways (1)

Supriya M. Nair

Part I: Movements and Migrations

The Other Postcolonial Wars: Amerindians versus Coastlanders in The Ventriloquist’s Tale (29)

Albert Braz

The Slave Narrative in the Anglophone Caribbean (45)

Nicole N. Aljoe

Locating India in the Caribbean: Indo-Caribbean Literature, Gender, and Subjectivity (60)

Brinda Mehta

Behind the Counter: Teaching Chinese Jamaican Texts in the Caribbean Literature Course (80)

Timothy Chin

Anglophone Caribbean Immigrants in the Harlem Renaissance (98)

Louis J. Parascandola

Black Britain and Its Antecedents (113)

John C. Hawley

Literary and Linguistic Crossings: The Shifting Boundaries of Anglophone Caribbean Literature (131)

April Shemak

Part II: Ritual, Performance, and Popular Culture

“Disguise Up de English Language”: Turning Linguistic Tricks in Creole-Anglophone Caribbean Literature (155)

Carolyn Cooper

“Play Mas Bachannal”: Toward a Pedagogy of J’ouvert and Identity Politics (168)

Paula Morgan

Using Film to Enhance Cultural Understanding: Images of Jamaica in How Stella Got Her Groove Back and The Harder They Come (183)

Giselle Liza Anatol

From Obeah to Syncretism: Teaching Gothic Literature and Early Caribbean Spiritual Culture (199)

Joshua Albert Brewer

The Politics of Collective Creation: Teaching Sistren’s Bellywoman Bangarang and Ida Revolt inna Jonkonnu Stylee (220)

Karina Smith

Part III: Interpretive Approaches

Reading the Nineteenth Century (233)

Faith Smith

Beyond the Pale, Beyond the Dark: Representing Caribbean Racial Realities at a US University (255)

Rhonda Frederick

Materializing the Anglophone Caribbean Text: Rum, a Case Study (279)

Jennifer P. Nesbitt

Unspeakable Thoughts, Unspoken Loss in Shani Mootoo’s Cereus Blooms at Night: Trauma, Gender, and Sexuality (292)

Grant Farred

On Daffodils and Castaways: Intertextual Approaches to Teaching Anglophone Caribbean Literature (305)

Shane Graham

Reading about Reading in the Anglophone Caribbean Novel (317)

Alisa K. Braithwaite

Anglophone Caribbean Literature in Context: A Comparative Perspective (330)

Vivian Nun Halloran

Part IV: Course Contexts

Teaching Anglophone Caribbean Literature: Creolization, Carnival, Crossings (343)

Elaine Savory

Autobiographical Occasions: A Graduate Seminar in Caribbean Autobiography (365)

Sandra Pouchet Paquet

Teaching Mary Seacole in a First-Year Writing Seminar (380)

Elizabeth Way

“Prediction and Memory”: Two Texts in Conversation: Homer’s Odyssey and Derek Walcott’s Omeros (405)

Mimi Pipino

Gender, the Pastoral, and the Postcolonial Caribbean (420)

Denise deCaires Narain

Part V: Teaching Resources

A Selective Guide to Anglophone Caribbean Literature (435)

Supriya M. Nair

Notes on Contributors (445)

Index (451)